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US Federal Aviation Administration

US Federal Aviation Administration News

Keeping up to date with the latest changes in aviation regulations requires the user to actively visit all the web sites relating to his or her aircraft, airspace, regulations and safety issues. In this space we provide pages with news feeds from the major aviation authorities, saving you time and you need to visit only one place.

The news feed below presents the latest information from the US FAA. Make sure to check these feeds as they might be appropriate to your flying activities.

Latest Regulatory News

News and updates to FAA regulatory information, including formal publications, regulations and guidance material.

US Federal Aviation Administration

  • FAA Air Traffic Report

    Date: 10/21/2020 04:07 PM

    Today's Air Traffic Report:

    Clouds could delay flights today in Boston (BOS), Houston (HOU, IAH), Los Angeles (LAX), the New York area (EWR, JFK, LGA), Philadelphia (PHL), San Diego (SAN), San Francisco (SFO) and the Washington, D.C., area (BWI, DCA, IAD). Thunderstorms are forecast in Fort Lauderdale (FLL), Orlando (MCO), Miami (MIA) and Tampa (TPA). Snow is possible in Minneapolis-St. Paul (MSP). Smoke from wildfires is expected in Denver (DEN).

    .

    Pilots: Check out the new Graphical Forecasts for Aviation (GFA) Tool from the Aviation Weather Center.

    For up-to-the-minute air traffic operations information, visit fly.faa.gov, and follow @FAANews on Twitter for the latest news and Air Traffic Alerts.

    The FAA Air Traffic Report provides a reasonable expectation of any daily impactsto normal air traffic operations, i.e. arrival/departure delays, ground stoppages, airport closures. This information is for air traffic operations planning purposes and is reliable as weather forecasts and other factors beyond our ability to control.

    Always check with your air carrier for flight-specific delay information.

  • U.S. Transportation Secretary Elaine L. Chao Announces Historic Commercial Space Transportation Reforms

    Date: 10/15/2020 05:33 PM

    New rule modernizes the way FAA regulates and licenses commercial space operations.

  • FAA Updates on Boeing 737 MAX

    Date: 10/07/2020 12:14 AM

    10/6/2020

    The FAA posted the draft Flight Standardization Board (FSB) report on the proposed pilot training for the Boeing 737 MAX this afternoon.It can be found here under FSBR B737.

    The report incorporates the recommendations from the Joint Operations Evaluation Board (JOEB) which recently met for nine days. The JOEB was comprised of civil aviation authorities from the United States, Canada, Brazil, and the European Union.

    The comment period on the draft FSB report will last through November 2, 2020. The FAA will publish a final FSB report after reviewing and addressing public comments on the draft FSB Report.

    While this is an important step, several key milestones remain:

    • Final Design Documentation and Technical Advisory Board (TAB) Report The FAA will review Boeings final design documentation to evaluate compliance with all FAA regulations. The multi-agency TAB will also review the final Boeing submission and issue a final report prior to a final determination of compliance by the FAA.
    • Continued Airworthiness Notification to the International Community (CANIC) & AD The FAA will issue a CANIC providing notice of pending significant safety actions and will publish a final AD that addresses the known issues for grounding. The AD will advise operators of required corrective actions before aircraft may re-enter commercial service.
    • FAA Rescinds Grounding Order This marks the official ungrounding of the aircraft, pending completion by operators of the work specified in the AD, along with any required training.
    • Certificates of Airworthiness The FAA will retain its authority to issue airworthiness certificates and export certificates for all new 737 MAX airplanes manufactured since the grounding. The FAA will perform in-person, individual reviews of these aircraft.
    • Operator Training Programs The FAA will review and approve training programs for all Part 121 operators.

    These actions are applicable only to U.S. air carriers and U.S.-registered aircraft.While our processes will inform other civil aviation authorities, they must take their own actions to return the Boeing 737 MAX to service for their air carriers. The FAA will ensure that our international counterparts have all necessary information to make a timely, safety-focused decision.


    9/16/2020

    FAA Statement on House Transportation & Infrastructure Committee Report

    The FAA is committed to continually advancing aviation safety and looks forward to working with the Committee to implement improvements identified in its report. We are already undertaking important initiatives based on what we have learned from our own internal reviews as well as independent reviews of the Lion Air and Ethiopian Airlines accidents. These initiatives are focused on advancing overall aviation safety by improving our organization, processes, and culture.Last month, the FAA published a notice of proposed rulemaking (NPRM) for an airworthiness directive (AD) that will mandate a number of design changes to the Boeing 737 MAX before it returns to passenger service. The FAA continues to follow a thorough process, not a prescribed timeline, for returning the aircraft to service.


    8/3/2020

    Boeing 737 MAX AD NPRM Now Available for Early Public Review

    Today, the FAA sent a notice of proposed rulemaking (NPRM) for a Boeing 737 MAX airworthiness directive (AD) to the Office of the Federal Register for publication.The NPRM proposes mandating a number of design changes to address an identified unsafe condition.When the NPRM publishes in the Federal Register, a 45 day public comment period will begin. The FAA is posting the NPRM on its website today to enable the public to begin review early.

    The FAA will also be placing the Preliminary Summary of the FAAs Review of the Boeing 737 MAX in the docket to assist with the review of the proposed AD.


    7/21/2020

    FAA Statement


    In the near future, the FAA plans to issue a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NPRM) for an Airworthiness Directive (AD) affecting the Boeing 737 MAX. In keeping with our commitment to remain transparent, the NPRM will provide 45 days for the public to comment on proposed design changes and crew procedures to mitigate the safety issues identified during the investigations that followed the Lion Air and Ethiopian Airlines accidents.

    The agency continues to follow a robust certification process. In addition to the standard FAA certification team, the 737 MAX Technical Advisory Board (TAB) continues to provide valuable review and consultation.

    While the posting of the NPRM is an important milestone, a number of key steps remain. The remaining tasks include:

    • JOEB Validation & FSB Review Final planning is underway for the FAAs Flight Standardization Board (FSB) and the Joint Operations Evaluation Board (JOEB) review of proposed training for flight crews, based on the design change and crew procedures. The results of this evaluation will be included in the updated Flight Standardization Board report, which will also be posted for public comment.
      The JOEB will include regulators from Canada, Europe, and Brazil and will evaluate minimum pilot training requirements. The FSB will issue a draft report for public comment addressing the findings of the JOEB.
    • Final FSB Report The FAA will publish a final FSB report after reviewing and addressing public comments.
    • Final Design Documentation and TAB Report The FAA will review Boeings final design documentation to evaluate compliance with all FAA regulations. The multi-agency Technical Advisory Board will also review the final Boeing submission and issue a final report prior to a final determination of compliance by the FAA.
    • CANIC & AD The FAA will issue a Continued Airworthiness Notification to the International Community (CANIC) providing notice of pending significant safety actions and will publish a final Airworthiness Directive (AD) that addresses the known issues for grounding. The AD will advise operators of required corrective actions before aircraft may re-enter commercial service.
    • FAA Rescinds Grounding Order This marks the official ungrounding of the aircraft, pending completion by operators of the work specified in the AD, along with any required training.
    • Certificates of Airworthiness The FAA will retain its authority to issue airworthiness certificates and export certificates for all new 737 MAX airplanes manufactured since the grounding. The FAA will perform in-person, individual reviews of these aircraft.
    • Operator Training Programs The FAA will review and approve training programs for all Part 121 operators.

    The FAA will not speculate when the work will be completed. The agency continues to follow a deliberate process and will take the time it needs to thoroughly review Boeings work. We will lift the grounding order only after FAA safety experts are satisfied that the aircraft meets certification standards.


    7/1/2020

    FAA Statement on 737 MAX Certification Flights

    The FAA and Boeing today completed the certification flight tests on the Boeing 737 MAX. During three days of testing this week, FAA pilots and engineers evaluated Boeings proposed changes in connection with the automated flight control system on the aircraft. While completion of the flights is an important milestone, a number of key tasks remain, including evaluating the data gathered during these flights. The agency is following a deliberate process and will take the time it needs to thoroughly review Boeings work. We will lift the grounding order only after FAA safety experts are satisfied that the aircraft meets certification standards.

    The remaining tasks include:

    • JOEB Validation & FSB Review The FAAs Flight Standardization Board (FSB) and the Joint Operations Evaluation Board (JOEB) which includes international partners from Canada, Europe, and Brazil will evaluate minimum pilot training requirements. The FSB will issue a draft report for public comment addressing the findings of the FSB and JOEB.
    • Final FSB Report The FAA will publish a final FSB report after reviewing and addressing public comments.
    • Final Design Documentation and TAB Report The FAA will review Boeings final design documentation in order to evaluate compliance with all FAA regulations. The multi-agency Technical Advisory Board (TAB) will also review the final Boeing submission and issue a final report prior to a final determination of compliance by the FAA.
    • CANIC & AD The FAA will issue a Continued Airworthiness Notification to the International Community (CANIC) providing notice of pending significant safety actions and will publish an Airworthiness Directive (AD) that addresses the known issues for grounding. The AD will advise operators of required corrective actions before aircraft may re-enter commercial service.
    • FAA Rescinds Grounding Order This marks the official ungrounding of the aircraft, pending completion by operators of the work specified in the AD, along with any required training.
    • Certificates of Airworthiness The FAA will retain its authority to issue airworthiness certificates and export certificates for all new 737 MAX airplanes manufactured since the grounding. The FAA will perform in-person, individual reviews of these aircraft.
    • Operator Training Programs The FAA will review and approve training programs for all part 121 operators.

    6/29/2020

    FAA Statement on Certification Flights

    The FAA and Boeing are conducting a series of certification flights this week to evaluate Boeings proposed changes to the automated flight control system on the 737 MAX. The aircraft departed from Boeing Field in Seattle at 9:55 a.m. Pacific Time today for the first round of testing. The flight is expected to take several hours.

    The certification flights are expected to take approximately three days. They will include a wide array of flight maneuvers and emergency procedures to assess whether the changes meet FAA certification standards. The tests are being conducted by test pilots and engineers from the FAA and Boeing.

    While the certification flights are an important milestone, a number of key tasks remain. The FAA is following a deliberate process and will take the time it needs to thoroughly review Boeings work. We will lift the grounding order only after we are satisfied that the aircraft meets certification standards.


    1/16/2020

    Statement from FAA Administrator Steve Dickson on the Special Committees report on aircraft certification

    The FAAs first priority is safety, and we are committed to a philosophy of continuous improvement. We welcome and appreciate the Special Committees insights and recommendations. I was pleased to see that the committee recommended weadvance the use of Safety Management Systems throughout all sectors of the aviation industry. The agency will carefully consider the committees work, along with the recommendations identified in various investigative reports and other analyses, as we take steps to enhance our aircraft certification processes.


    1/10/2020

    FAA Statement on Emails

    The FAA reviewed the most recent 737 MAX-related documents submitted by Boeing for the purpose of identifying any safety implications. Our experts determined that nothing in the submission pointed to any safety risks that were not already identified as part of the ongoing review of proposed modifications to the aircraft.

    The FAA maintains a rigorous process for qualifying flight simulators. Upon reviewing the records for the specific simulator mentioned in the documents, the agency determined that piece of equipment has been evaluated and qualified three times in the last six months. Any potential safety deficiencies identified in the documents have been addressed.

    While the tone and content of some of the language contained in the documents is disappointing, the FAA remains focused on following a thorough process for returning the Boeing 737 MAX to passenger service. We continue to work with other international aviation safety regulators to review the proposed changes to the aircraft. Our first priority is safety, and we have set no timeframe for when the work will be completed.


    10/25/2019

    FAA Statement on Lion Air Flight 610 Accident Report

    The FAAs first priority is always safety.The Indonesian National Transportation Safety Committees accident report on Lion Air Flight 610 is a sober reminder to us of the importance of that mission, and we again express our deepest condolences to the families and loved ones of those who were lost in that tragic accident.

    We welcome the recommendations from this report and will carefully consider these and all other recommendations as we continue our review of the proposed changes to the Boeing 737 MAX. The FAA is committed to ensuring that the lessons learned from the losses of Lion Air Flight 610 and Ethiopian Airlines Flight 302will result in an even greater level of safety globally.

    The FAA continues to review Boeings proposed changes to the 737 MAX. As we have previously stated, the aircraft will return to service only after the FAA determines it is safe.


    10/18/2019

    FAA Statement

    Late yesterday, Boeing alerted the Department of Transportation to the existence of instant messages between two Boeing employees, characterizing certain communications with the FAA during the original certification of the 737 MAX in 2016. Boeing explained to the Department that it had discovered this document some months ago.

    The Department immediately brought this document to the attention of both FAA leadership and the Departments Inspector General.

    The FAA finds the substance of the document concerning. The FAA is also disappointed that Boeing did not bring this document to our attention immediately upon its discovery. The FAA is reviewing this information to determine what action is appropriate.

    The FAA has shared this document with the appropriate Congressional committees and plans to provide additional related documents today.

    The FAA is following a thorough process, not a prescribed timeline, for returning the Boeing 737 MAX to passenger service. The agency will lift the grounding order only after we have determined the aircraft is safe.

    ---

    Read the letter FAA Administrator Steve Dickson sent to Boeing.


    10/11/2019

    FAA Administrator Dickson is reviewing every recommendation and will take appropriate action.

    Statement from FAA Administrator Steve Dickson:

    I thank Chairman Chris Hart and the Joint Authorities Technical Review (JATR) members for their unvarnished and independent review of the certification of the Boeing 737 MAX.

    As FAA Administrator, I will review every recommendation and take appropriate action.

    Todays unprecedented U.S. safety record was built on the willingness of aviation professionals to embrace hard lessons and to seek continuous improvement. We welcome this scrutiny and are confident that our openness to these efforts will further bolster aviation safety worldwide. The accidents in Indonesia and Ethiopia are a somber reminder that the FAA and our international regulatory partners must strive to constantly strengthen aviation safety.


    9/26/2019

    FAA welcomes and appreciates NTSB's recommendations.

    The FAAs first priority is safety. We welcome and appreciate the NTSBs recommendations. The agency will carefully review these and all other recommendations as we continue our review of the proposed changes to the Boeing 737 MAX. The FAA is committed to a philosophy of continuous improvement. The lessons learned from the investigations into the tragic accidents of Lion Air Flight 610 and Ethiopian Airlines Flight 302will be a springboard to an even greater level of safety.


    9/23/2019

    FAA and Technical Experts Meet with Safety Regulators to Continue Discussions on Boeing 737 Max

    MONTREAL The Federal Aviation Administration and a team of technical experts met today with safety regulators from around the world to discuss the continuing efforts to return the Boeing 737 MAX jetliner to service.

    FAA Administrator Steve Dickson and Deputy Administrator Dan Elwell delivered opening remarks to more than 50 invited officials, all of whom will play a role in clearing the aircraft for further flight in their respective nations.

    Ali Bahrami, the FAAs Associate Administrator for Aviation Safety, provided details on the FAAs many activities to certify the aircraft since the group of regulators first met four months ago in Fort Worth, Texas. A senior Boeing Co. executive provided a technical briefing on the companys efforts to address the safety regulators shared concerns.

    During the meeting, Administrator Dickson pledged that the FAA would continue to share information about the FAAs activities to ensure the proposed changes to the automated flight control system on the 737 MAX meet certification standards. In the name of continuous improvement, we welcome feedback from our fellow civil aviation authorities, the aviation industry and the important independent reviews of the MAX and the FAAs certification process, Dickson said.

    Dickson told the group that the last few months have made it clear that, in the mind of the traveling public, aviation safety recognizes no borders. Travelers demand the same high level of safety no matter where they fly, he said. It is up to us as aviation regulators to deliver on this shared responsibility.

    The FAA continues to follow a thorough process, not a prescribed timeline, for returning the aircraft to passenger service. The FAA has a transparent and collaborative relationship with other civil aviation authorities as we continue our review of changes to software on the Boeing 737 MAX. Our first priority is safety, and we have set no timeframe for when the work will be completed. Each government will make its own decision to return the aircraft to service, based on a thorough safety assessment.


    8/30/2019

    Joint Authorities Technical Review (JATR) Panel to Deliver Findings in Coming Weeks.

    The Joint Authorities Technical Review (JATR) panel is taking additional time to finish documenting its work. We expect the group to submit its observations, findings, and recommendations in the coming weeks.

    Chaired by former National Transportation Safety Board Chairman Christopher A. Hart, the JATR is comprised of technical safety experts from nine civil aviation authorities worldwide, as well as the FAA and NASA. The team received extensive overviews and engaged in subsequent discussions about the design, certification, regulations, compliance, training, and Organization Designation Authorization activities associated with the 737 MAX.

    The JATRs focus on the certification of the aircraft is separate from the ongoing efforts to safely return the aircraft to flight. The FAA continues to follow a thorough process, not a prescribed timeline, for returning the aircraft to passenger service. While the agencys certification processes are well-established and have consistently produced safe aircraft designs, we welcome the scrutiny from these experts and look forward to their findings.

    We will carefully review all recommendations and will incorporate any changes that would improve our certification activities.


    6/26/2019 4:45 p.m. Update

    FAA Statement

    The FAA is following a thorough process, not a prescribed timeline, for returning the Boeing 737 Max to passenger service.The FAA will lift the aircrafts prohibition order when we deem it is safe to do so.We continue to evaluate Boeings software modification to the MCAS and we are still developing necessary training requirements. We also are responding to recommendations received from the Technical Advisory Board (TAB). The TAB is an independent review panel we have asked to review our work regarding 737 Max return to service.

    On the most recent issue, the FAAs process is designed to discover and highlight potential risks.The FAA recently found a potential risk that Boeing must mitigate.


    6/2/2019 Update

    FAA Statement

    Boeing has informed the FAA that certain 737NG and 737MAX leading edge slat tracks may have been improperly manufactured and may not meet all applicable regulatory requirements for strength and durability.

    Following an investigation conducted by Boeing and the FAA Certificate Management Office (CMO), we have determined that up to 148 parts manufactured by a Boeing sub-tier supplier are affected. Boeing has identified groups of both 737NG and 737MAX airplane serial numbers on which these suspect parts may have been installed. 32 NG and 33 MAX are affected in the U.S. Affected worldwide fleet are 133 NG and 179 MAX aircraft.

    The affected parts may be susceptible to premature failure or cracks resulting from the improper manufacturing process. Although a complete failure of a leading edge slat track would not result in the loss of the aircraft, a risk remains that a failed part could lead to aircraft damage in flight.

    The FAA will issue an Airworthiness Directive to mandate Boeing's service actions to identify and remove the discrepant parts from service. Operators of affected aircraft are required to perform this action within 10 days. The FAA today also alerted international civil aviation authorities of this condition and required actions.


    5/23/2019 Update

    FAA Acting Administrator Dan Elwell's Closing Remarks at Directorates General Meeting


    Thanks for joining us. Todays meeting was both comprehensive and constructive. While the tragic circumstances that brought all of us together might be considered extraordinarythere is nothing extraordinary about the level of commitment to safety shared by all of us. Our sense of missionthat makes aviation the safest form of transportationruns strong and deep, and binds all of us. If not in one meeting in Ft. Worth, we are comparing notes in symposiums around the world, were in web-based conferences, or we simply pick up the phone.

    So, let me give you a short recap of what we covered today:

    • How the FAA responded to the MAX accidents and how were supporting the two international accident investigations
    • How we plan to certify Boeings MCAS changes and how weve been sharing information with all the regulators here.
    • The latest status on the Technical Advisory Board, or TAB, which is reviewing Boeings MCAS software update and system safety assessment. As you know, the TAB is tasked with identifying any issues where further investigation is recommended before we approve the MCAS design change.
    • Details of the Boeings proposed changes to the MAX both to the flight control system and pilot training
    • A review of the technical steps and sequence of events that we anticipate would be involved in ungrounding the MAX fleet here in the United States
    • A discussion of international considerations for returning the MAX to service outside the United States

    What happens next is that, here in the U.S., we await Boeings completed for changes to the MAX. Once received we perform our final risk assessments and analyses, taking into account findings of the TAB and any information we receive from our international counterparts. Well also take part in test flights of a modified 737 MAX and weigh all the information together before making the decision to return the aircraft to service.

    Internationally, each country has to make its own decisions, but the FAA will make available to our counterparts all that we have learned, all that we have done, and all of our assistance under our International Civil Aviation Organization commitments.

    As all of us work through this rigorous process, we will continue to be transparent and exchange all that we know and all that we do to strengthen the publics confidence that the aircraft will meet the highest safety standards.


    5/22/2019 Update

    FAA Acting
    Administrator Dan Elwell's Opening Remarks at Directorates General Meeting

    Good afternoon and welcome to the FAAs Southwest Regional office here in Fort Worth. As you know, tomorrow well be meeting with dozens of regulators from across the globe to discuss our ongoing efforts aimed at getting the Boeing 737 MAX back into service.

    Well be sharing with them the safety analysis that will form the basis for our return-to-service decision process here in the United States, and well offer the FAAs assistance in helping them with their individual decisions on returning the aircraft to service in their countries. Well also welcome their feedback to help us with our shared goal of keeping aviations safety record the envy of other transportation modes.

    The FAA and our colleagues around the world know that the success of the global aviation system rests squarely on our shared commitment of safety and our common understanding of what it takes to achieve it. Its because we have a common framework through the International Civil Aviation Organization for how we design, build and operate airliners.

    Under that framework, The State of Design which is the United States for the MAX has the obligation to provide all States that operate an aircraft with the information that assures its safe operation. For the MAX, Boeing has not yet submitted its final request to change the MCAS, but we can share what information we do have to contribute to our safety evaluations.

    So thats what well do tomorrow explain our understanding of the risks that need to be addressed, the steps we propose to address those risks, and how well propose to bring the 737 MAX back to service. And let me be very clear about that the FAA will return the 737 MAX to service in the United States only when we determine based on facts and technical data that it is safe to do so.

    Well also discuss how making the entire process transparent toward strengthening public confidence after two accidents. We all want travelers to have the highest confidence in the aviation system when they fly.

    Once the meeting is completed tomorrow afternoon, well brief you again on the events of the day.

    Ill take your questions now.


    5/3/2019 3:00pm Update

    This week, the Joint Authorities Technical Review (JATR) team held its first meeting to review the FAAs certification of the Boeing 737 MAXs automated flight control system. Chaired by former NTSB Chairman Christopher A. Hart, the JATR is comprised of technical safety experts from 9 civil aviation authorities worldwide, including the FAA, as well as from NASA.

    The team received extensive overviews and engaged in subsequent discussions about the design, certification, regulations, compliance, training, and Organization Designation Authorization program associated with the 737 MAX.Over the next few months, JATR participants will take a comprehensive look at the FAAs certification of the aircrafts automated flight control system. Each participant will individually provide the FAA with findings regarding the adequacy of the certification process and any recommendations to improve the process.

    The JATR is separate from and not required to approve enhancements for the return of the 737 MAX to service. The team concluded an initial, substantive week of gathering information and planning its next meetings.


    5/3/2019 1:45pm Update

    Supplemental FAA letter to Senate Commerce, Science, and Transportation Committee Chairman Wicker available here.


    4/29/2019 12:30pm Update

    The FAA has convened todays initial Joint Authorities Technical Review (JATR) meeting as it evaluates aspects of the original certification of the Boeing 737 MAXs automated flight control system. This gathering of international civilian aviation authorities and safety technical experts represents the best spirit of cooperation and collaboration that have contributed to aviations strong safety record. All participants are committed to a single safety mission, and will not rest where aviations safety record is concerned. We expect the JATR to engage in a free and candid discussion that exchanges information and improves future processes. Their work is not a prerequisite for the 737 MAX to return to service. The FAA will continue to share its technical experience and knowledge to support the international aviation community and, specifically over the next three months, the JATR participants.


    4/19/2019 3:00pm Update

    Experts from nine civil aviation authorities have confirmed they will participate in the Boeing 737 MAX Joint Authorities Technical Review (JATR) that the FAA established earlier this month. The JATR team will conduct a comprehensive review of the certification of the aircrafts automated flight control system.

    The JATR is chaired by former NTSB Chairman Chris Hart and comprised of a team of experts from the FAA, NASAand international aviation authorities. The team will evaluate aspects of the 737 MAX automated flight control system, including its design and pilots interaction with the system, to determine its compliance with all applicable regulations and to identify future enhancements that might be needed.

    The team is scheduled to first meet on April 29 and its work is expected to take 90 days.

    Confirmed participants include:

    Australia
    Civil Aviation Safety Authority (CASA)

    Brazil
    Agencia Nacional de Aviao Civil (ANAC)

    Canada
    Transport Canada Civil Aviation (TCCA)

    China
    Civil Aviation Administration of China (CAAC)

    European Union
    European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA)

    Japan
    Japan Civil Aviation Bureau (JCAB)

    Indonesia
    Directorate General of Civil Aviation (DGCA)

    Singapore
    Civil Aviation Authority of Singapore (CAAS)

    United Arab Emirates
    General Civil Aviation Authority (UAE GCAA)


    4/16/2019 4:15pm Update

    The FAA today posted a draft reportfrom the Boeing 737 MAX Flight Standardization Board. The FSB reviewed only the training aspects related to software enhancements to the aircraft. The report is open to public comment for 14 days. After that, the FAA will review those comments before making a final assessment. Boeing Co. is still expected in the coming weeks to submit the final software package for certification.


    4/12/19 4:20pm Update

    FAA Statement on Boeing 737 MAX

    The FAA convened a meeting today, April 12, at the agencys Washington, D.C. headquarters with safety representatives of the three U.S.-based commercial airlines that have the Boeing 737 MAX in their fleets, as well as the pilot unions for those airlines.

    The approximately 3-hour meeting opened with remarks from Acting Administrator Dan Elwell and covered three major agenda items: a review of the publicly available preliminary findings of the investigations into the Lion Air and Ethiopian Airlines accidents; an overview of the anticipated software enhancements to the MCAS system; and, an overview of pilot training. Each presentation corresponding to the agenda, delivered by FAA subject matter experts, allowed for an open exchange between all participants.

    In his opening remarks, Elwell characterized the meeting as a listening session for the FAA to hear from the participants for a fuller understanding of the safety issues presented by the Boeing 737 MAX. Elwell said that he wanted to know what operators and pilots of the 737 MAX think as the agency evaluates what needs to be done before the FAA makes a decision to return the aircraft to service. Elwell emphasized that the same level of transparency, dialog, and all available tools that have created aviations incomparable safety record also will apply to the FAAs ongoing review of the aircrafts return to service. Elwell said that the participants operational perspective is critical input as the agency welcomes scrutiny on how it can do better. As the meeting concluded, Elwell committed to the participants that the agency values transparency on its work toward the FAAs decisions related to the aircraft.


    4/4/19 6:10pm Update

    FAA Statement on Boeing 737 MAX

    FAA letter to Senate Commerce, Science, and Transportation Committee Chairman Wicker available here.


    4/4/19 8:30am Update

    FAA Statement on Boeing 737 MAX

    The investigation by Ethiopian authorities remains ongoing, with the participation of the FAA and the NTSB.We continue to work toward a full understanding of all aspects of this accident.As we learn more about the accident and findings become available, we will take appropriate action.


    4/2/19 4:00pm Update

    FAA Establishes Joint Authorities Technical Review (JATR) for Boeing 737 MAX

    The FAA is establishing a Joint Authorities Technical Review (JATR). Chaired by former NTSB Chairman Chris Hart and comprised of a team of experts from the FAA, NASAand international aviation authorities, the JATR will conduct a comprehensive review of the certification of the automated flight control system on the Boeing 737 MAX aircraft. The JATR team will evaluate aspects of the 737 MAX automated flight control system, including its design and pilots interaction with the system, to determine its compliance with all applicable regulations and to identify future enhancements that might be needed.


    4/1/19 4:00pm Update

    FAA Statement on Boeing 737 MAX Software Update

    The FAA expects to receive Boeings final package of its software enhancement over the coming weeks for FAA approval. Time is needed for additional work by Boeing as the result of an ongoing review of the 737 MAX Flight Control System to ensure that Boeing has identified and appropriately addressed all pertinent issues. Upon receipt, the FAA will subject Boeings completed submission to a rigorous safety review. The FAA will not approve the software for installation until the agency is satisfied with the submission.


    3/20/19 5:00pm Update

    Update on FAA's Continued Operational Safety Activities Related to the Boeing 737 MAX Fleet

    FAA issues newContinued Airworthiness Notification to the International Community on Boeing 737 MAX.


    3/13/19 3:00pm Update

    Statement from the FAA on Ethiopian Airlines

    The FAA is ordering the temporary grounding of Boeing 737 MAX aircraftoperated by U.S. airlines or in U.S. territory. The agency made this decision as a result of the data gathering process and new evidence collected at the site and analyzed today. This evidence, together with newly refined satellite data available to FAA this morning, led to this decision.

    The grounding will remain in effect pending further investigation, including examination of information from the aircrafts flight data recorders and cockpit voice recorders. An FAA team is in Ethiopia assisting the NTSB as parties to the investigation of the Flight 302 accident. The agency will continue to investigate.


    3/12/19 6:10pm Update

    Statement from Acting FAA Administrator Daniel K. Elwell


    The FAA continues to review extensively all available data and aggregate safety performance from operators and pilots of the Boeing 737 MAX.Thus far, our review shows no systemic performance issues and provides no basis to order grounding the aircraft. Nor have other civil aviation authorities provided data to us that would warrant action.In the course of our urgent review of data on the Ethiopian Airlines Flight 302 crash, if any issues affecting the continued airworthiness of the aircraft are identified, the FAA will take immediate and appropriate action.


    3/11/19 6:00pm Update

    The FAA has issued a Continued Airworthiness Notification to the International Community (CANIC) related to the Boeing 737-8 and Boeing 737-9 (737 MAX) fleet.


    3/11/19 3:15pm Update

    An FAA team is on-site with the NTSB in its investigation of Ethiopian Airlines Flight 302.We are collecting data and keeping in contact with international civil aviation authorities as information becomes available.Today, the FAA will issue a Continued Airworthiness Notification to the International Community (CANIC) for Boeing 737 MAX operators. The FAA continuously assesses and oversees the safety performance of U.S. commercial aircraft. If we identify an issue that affects safety, the FAA will take immediate and appropriate action.

  • 100 Years of Aviation in Alaska

    Date: 10/06/2020 08:54 PM

    FAA issues free educational resource discussing 100 years of work to create a safe, modern aviation system in Alaska.

  • Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19) Update

    Date: 10/03/2020 02:15 AM

    10/2/2020

    Extension of Minimum Slot Usage Requirements

    The FAA issued an extension of limited waiver of the minimum slot usage requirements through March 27, 2021. This slot usage waiver applies to John F. Kennedy International Airport (JFK), New York LaGuardia Airport (LGA), and Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport (DCA). Additionally, the FAA also extended through March 27, 2021 our COVID-19-related policy for prioritizing flights canceled at designated International Air Transport Association (IATA) Level 2 airports in the United States for purposes of establishing a carriers operational baseline in the next corresponding scheduling season.

    The relief announced in this notice is available for the Winter 2020/2021 scheduling season, which runs from October 25, 2020 through March 27, 2021. Conditions on the relief announced in this notice require compliance beginning on October 15, 2020.


    9/30/2020

    Second Amendment to Special Federal Aviation Regulation (SFAR) 118

    The Federal Aviation Administration issued a final rule on September 30, 2020, that further amends Special Federal Aviation Regulation (SFAR) 118. Aviation activity continues to increase, and the industry is beginning to address the backlog of required training, checking and testing requirements. However, many of the challenges that existed when the FAA first issued the SFAR in April remain today as the public health emergency continues. SFAR 118-2 is effective on October 1, 2020, and is available for public display in theFederal Register. It will publish on October 6, 2020.

    The chart contained within this final rule provides a summary of each affected regulation; the original SFAR relief provided on April 29, 2020; the amended SFAR relief from June 25, 2020; and the second amended relief provided in this SFAR update. Those who may be affected by this amendment should carefully review the eligibility, conditions and duration of each section of relief to ensure compliance. The FAA has revised theFAQs(PDF)to help explain the amended regulatory relief.

    Amendment of Air Carrier Training Exemptions

    The FAA is amending two regulatory exemptions it previously issued to scheduled and on-demand US air carriers. The agency is amending exemptions18510(PDF)and18511(PDF), which give personnel grace periods for completing certain training and qualification requirements due through Dec. 31, 2020. The agency previously amended through Nov. 30, 2020 exemptions18509and18512, which give crewmembers relief from having to don protective breathing equipment or oxygen masks in training, checking, or evaluation. The amendments do not expand relief that the original exemptions and previous amendments provided. The new amendments extend the same relief to the next population of crewmembers who will become due in the approaching months.


    9/29/2020

    FAA Extends Flight Attendant Exemption

    TheFAA is amending through Jan. 31, 2021 an exemption the agency previously issued to help protect flight attendants from contracting COVID-19. The exemption allows flight attendants to relocate from the seats they would normally occupy so they can observe social distancing. It also excuses them from having to demonstrate the use of certain emergency equipment including life preservers and oxygen masks, allowing for alternative methods to inform passengers regarding the use of such equipment. Individual carriers must submit a Letter of Intent and be granted authorization by FAA in order to exercise the relief in the exemption.

    Updated Health Guidance for Air Carriers and Crews
    The FAA issued an updatedSafety Alert for Operators (SAFO)(PDF)that provides interim health guidance from the CDC that air carriers and crew members should be following during the COVID-19 public health emergency.


    8/13/2020

    FAA Amends Exemption for Certain Air Ambulance Personnel

    To ensure the continuity of air ambulance operations, the FAA is amending an exemption to the timeframes for completing recurrent training and testing requirements for certain air ambulance personnel. The amendment does not expand upon the relief the FAA already provided for personnel with training and testing requirements due through July 31, 2020. Rather, it provides the same relief to a new group of air personnel with training and qualification requirements due in August and September, 2020. Operators must fulfill specific requirements to exercise the relief offered in this exemption.


    7/31/2020

    Amendment of Air Carrier Training Exemptions

    The FAA is amending four regulatory exemptions it previously issued to scheduled and on-demand US air carriers. The agency is amending through Sept. 30, 2020 exemptions 18510 and 18511. The agency is amending through Nov. 30, 2020 exemptions 18509 and 18512. The exemptions give operators grace periods for completing certain training and qualification requirements, and give crewmembers relief from having to don protective breathing equipment or oxygen masks in training, checking, or evaluation. The new amendments do not expand relief that the original exemption and first amendment provided. The new amendments extend the same relief to the next population of crewmembers who will become due in the approaching months.


    7/23/2020

    FAA Issues Guidance about Flexibility Managing Scheduled Maintenance Requirements Due to COVID-19

    The FAA issued Information for Operators (InFO) 20005 which notifies operators of temporary changes to FAA policy on the use of short-term escalations (STE) to manage scheduled maintenance requirements affected by the COVID-19 public health emergency. This InFO also provides information on increased flexibilities related to the use of STEs and how operators may request FAA authorization for the expanded use of STEs.


    7/14/2020

    FAA issues new cargo exemption, amends existing cargo exemption

    The FAA issued a new exemption authorizing airlines to transport cargo that is secured to the seat tracks of a passenger aircraft when seats are removed and no passengers are in the cabin. This exemption is valid through July 10, 2021.

    The FAA also amended a previously issued exemption that allows airlines to secure cargo to passenger seats when no passengers are in the cabin. The amendment provides additional crew training details and extends the exemption through July 10, 2021.


    7/6/2020

    FAA Issues Guidance on Operations inTerminal Airspace
    The FAA has issued Safety Alert for Operators (SAFO) 20012 to advise air carriers and other commercial operators on how to continue operating safely in terminal airspace when anAir Traffic Control (ATC) facility with responsibility for that airspace closes unexpectedly.


    7/2/2020

    Government publishes national strategy for air transportation system recovery

    The U.S. government has published a comprehensive national strategy for the recovery of the nations air transportation system. The Runway to Recovery recognizes that a safe, secure, efficient and resilient air transportation system that addresses the threat of COVID-19 is critical to reducing the public health risk and supporting the United States critical infrastructure needs. The document provides guidance to airports and airlines for implementing measures to mitigate the public health risks associated with COVID-19 and prepare for an increase in travel volume, while ensuring that aviation safety and security are not compromised. It identifies measures that airports and airlines should implement across all operations and all stages of travel to, from and within the United States, along with a roadmap explaining how those measures should be adapted to the unique air travel environments.

    View the Department of Transportation's Press Release on the Runway to Recovery.


    7/1/2020

    FAA Issues Guidance on Operations inOceanic Airspace
    The FAA has issued SAFO 20011, Operations in Oceanic Airspace During the COVID-19 Public Health Emergency. This SAFO advises flightcrews of the potential loss of Air Traffic Control (ATC) services in the event of an oceanic ATC facility shutdown and recommends the mitigating procedures contained herein.


    6/25/2020

    FAA Amends SFAR 118 to Further Extend COVID-19 Relief
    The FAA has issued an amendment to Special Federal Aviation Regulation (SFAR)118. The amendment recognizes that even as stay-at-home advisories are lifted, airmen continue to experience difficulty complying with certain training, recency, checking, testing and duration requirements. The amendment extends some medical certificate relief that the original SFAR provided and expands medical relief to people whose certificates will expire in the coming months. It also expands relief to a new population of airmen who may be unable to satisfy training and qualification requirements due to disruptions caused by the COVID-19 public health emergency. Those who may be affected by this amendment should carefully review the eligibility, conditions and duration of each section of relief to ensure compliance.


    5/29/2020

    Extended Air Carrier Training Exemptions
    The FAA is extending through July 31, 2020 four regulatory exemptions (18509, 18510, 18511,18512) it previously issued to scheduled and on-demand US air carriers. The exemptions give operators grace periods for completing certain training and qualification requirements, and give crewmembers relief from having to don protective breathing equipment or oxygen masks in training, checking, or evaluation. They originally were going to expire on May 31.

    Updated CARES Act FAQs
    The FAA has updated our frequently asked questions about the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act.

    Updated Guidance for Airport Sponsors Considering COVID-19 Restrictions or Accommodations
    The FAA has prepared guidance for airport sponsors contemplating airport closures or restricting airport access at federally funded airports. The FAA wants airport sponsors to closely review and understand what the guidance allows them to do, what they cannot do, and what they should consider before taking any action. In any instance, the FAA must be notified and approve any airport closure.


    5/20/2020

    Exemption for Transporting Cargo on Airplane Seats

    The FAA issued an exemption that allows U.S. airlines to carry cargo on seats in airplane cabins when no passengers are being transported. The FAA determined the exemption would reduce the chance that movement of critical cargo would be interrupted as a result of the COVID-19 public health emergency. To exercise the exemption, airlines must submit a letter of intent and receive specific authorization from the FAA, and observe a number of conditions and limitations. The exemption is effectivethrough Dec. 31, 2020.


    5/13/2020

    FAA issues cargo guidance for safety inspectors

    The FAA has issued information and guidance for agency safety inspectors about the carriage of cargo in the cabin of passenger-carrying planes when no passengers are on board. The agency previously issued a Safety Alert for Operators (SAFO) that provides information and recommendations for airlines to evaluate regulatory implications and safety risks when transporting only cargo inside the passenger cabin of an airplane.


    5/11/2020

    Updated guidance for air carriers and crews to include additional information from the CDC on virus symptoms

    The FAA has updated SAFO 20009, COVID-19: Updated Interim Occupational Health and Safety Guidance for Air Carriers and Crews, primarily to add references to the CDC Symptoms of Coronavirus webpage.


    5/5/2020

    Additional aircraft-overflow-parking guidance for airport operators

    FAA has issued additional information and examples for airport operators to use when producing NOTAMs that close runways and/or taxiways to temporarily park aircraft.


    4/30/2020

    FAA Grants Exemption for Certain Air Ambulance Personnel

    To ensure the continuity of air ambulance operations, the FAA is granting an exemption to the timeframes for completing recurrent training and testing requirements for certain air ambulance personnel. Operators must fulfill specific requirements to exercise the relief offered in this exemption.


    4/29/2020

    FAA announces regulatory relief for groups unable to comply with certain training, testing, and checking requirements.

    The FAA has published a Special Federal Aviation Regulation (SFAR) that provides regulatory relief to a wide range of people and operations affected by the COVID-19 public health emergency. The relief applies to pilots, crew members and other FAA certificate holders including some drone pilots who have been unable to comply with certain training, recency- of-experience, testing, and checking requirements due to the outbreak. It also provides relief to certain people and pilot schools who are unable to meet duration and renewal requirements, including extending the validity period of FAA medical certificates.


    4/27/2020

    FAA releases list of control towers where hours will be temporarily adjusted

    The agency plans to begin making adjustments on Monday, April 27 and complete the process within about a week. View a list of the towers with adjusted hours.


    4/22/2020

    FAA to temporarily adjust operating hours of approximately 100 control towers

    To ensure the continued resiliency of the air traffic control system amid the COVID-19 pandemic, the FAA is planning to temporarily adjust the operating hours of approximately 100 control towers nationwide. Making these adjustments allows for continued safe operations throughout the national airspace system while minimizing health risks to our workforce.

    These facilities have seen a significant reduction in flights, especially during the evening and nighttime hours, since the pandemic began. Adjusting the operating hours will further protect our employees and reduce the possibility of temporary tower closures from COVID-19 exposures by ensuring enough controllers are available to staff the facilities during peak hours. It also will enable us to allocate difficult-to-source supplies where they are most needed.

    Most of the towers are historically closed at night, during which time the radar facility with oversight assumes the airspace. The FAA expects the adjustments will not have any operational effects. The agency plans to begin adjusting facility hours later this month.

    The FAA will continue to monitor traffic volume at all of these facilities and may make future adjustments to operating hours as appropriate.

    The FAA previously took steps to limit the spread of COVID-19 in air traffic control facilities by establishing separate teams of controllers that stay together throughout the duty week.

    Q1: How did the FAA decide on these operating hour adjustments?

    A:The FAA has seen a significant reduction in traffic at these facilities and reviewed a number of factors to determine where adjustments were most appropriate and could be implemented while maintaining safe and efficient operations. Criteria considered included: hourly aircraft counts and safety during non-towered times; air carrier, air taxi, and special operations; ability of the workforce to social distance and reduce exposure; savings of supplies; and infrastructure constraints. The FAA will coordinate with stakeholders before making any final decisions.

    Q2: What is the criteria to return to normal hours or how will you decide to restore the hours at these towers?

    A: The FAA will continually assess the operating environment throughout the National Airspace System (NAS). The FAA will ensure there is adequate staffing to meet traffic needs. As operational traffic counts and our resource factors associated with COVID-19 change, the FAA will make appropriate adjustments consistent with the agencys mandate to operate the NAS safely and efficiently.

    Q3: Is it possible that some of these locations will continue on adjusted hours permanently?

    A: Temporary adjustments to operating hours during this COVID-19 public health emergency are not intended to be made permanent.

    Q4: How will DOD/National Guard, medevac, or other specialized flights operate in these circumstances?

    A: The FAA considered known special operations in selecting locations for operating hour adjustments. FAA facility operating schedules have always varied throughout the NAS. During the hours that a control tower is closed, DOD, National Guard, and other aircraftwill receive services by the overlying radar facility as they do today according to existing FAA procedures. The FAA will continue to facilitate these special operations and will meet the needs of these operators.

    Q5: How are you ensuring the highest levels of safety continue?

    A: The FAA is working collaboratively with the aviation industry to ensure the highest levels of safety continue where the agency adjusts facility operating hours. The FAAs safety tools and programs are fully operational and are continually monitoring the NAS. Additionally, we are working with each airport sponsor to understand and evaluate any consequences. The FAA will continue open communication and outreach with industry at all levels to ensure safety remains everyones priority.


    4/17/2020

    Updated Health Guidance for Air Carriers and Crews

    The FAAs Safety Alert for Operators (SAFO) provides updated interim health guidance from the CDC that air carriers and crew members should be following during the COVID-19 public health emergency.


    4/16/2020

    1:30pm FAA Issues New Cargo Transportation Guidance

    The FAA has issued a Safety Alert for Operators (SAFO) that provides information and recommendations for airlines to evaluate regulatory implications and safety risks when transporting only cargo inside the passenger cabin of an airplane.

    10:00am FAA extends AIP Application Deadlines

    The COVID-19 public health emergency has affected airport sponsors operations and ability to meet the original 2020 Airport Improvement Program (AIP) deadlines. Therefore, the FAA has extended deadlines to May 4, 2020 to give notice of intent, and to Monday, June 15, 2020 to submit the final grant application. The full notice is available in the federal register.


    4/14/2020

    3:15pm Drone Use for COVID-19 Response Efforts

    The FAA is enabling drone use for COVID-19 response efforts within our existing regulations and emergency procedures. Our small unmanned aircraft rule (Part 107) and Certificate of Authorization process allow operators to transport goods and certain medical suppliesincluding test kits, most prescription drugs and, under certain circumstances, bloodprovided the flight complies with all provisions of the rule or authorization. The FAA also issues special approvals, some in less than an hour, for flights that support emergency activities and appropriate government, health, or community initiatives. The agencys Systems Operations Support Center is available 24/7 to process emergency requests. Safety is the top consideration as we review each request.

    1:30pm DOT Secretary Elaine L. Chao today announces the award of $10 billion to commercial and general aviation airports from the CARES Act Program

    U.S. Transportation Secretary Elaine L. Chao today announced the award of approximately $10 billion to commercial and general aviation airports from the Trump Administration's newly createdCoronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act Airport Grant Program. The effort will provide unprecedented and immediate relief to American families, workers, and businesses.


    4/13/2020

    FAA prepares list of FAQs for CARES Act stakeholders

    The FAA has prepared a list of frequently asked questions (FAQs) stakeholders may have about the approximately $10 billion in grants for airports under the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act.


    4/9/2020

    FAA extends temporary waiver of minimum slot-use requirements through Oct. 24, 2020

    The FAA is extending through Oct. 24, 2020 the temporary waiver of minimum slot-use requirements at U.S. airports to help airlines that cancel flights due to the Coronavirus. Under normal circumstances, airlines can lose their slots at congested airports if they don't use them at least 80 percent of the time. The FAA is waiving the 80-percent-use requirement for U.S. and foreign airlines that have affected flights. The FAA initially announced that the relief would be in effect through May 31, 2020.


    4/8/2020

    9:40pm FAA issues exemption to help protect flight attendants from COVID-19

    The FAA issued an exemption to help protect flight attendants from contracting COVID-19. The exemption allows flight attendants to relocate from the seats they would normally occupy so they can observe social distancing. It also excuses them from having to demonstrate the use of certain emergency equipment including life preservers and oxygen masks, allowing for alternative methods to inform passengers regarding the use of such equipment. Individual carriers must submit a Letter of Intent and be granted authorization by the FAA in order to exercise the relief in the exemption, which runs through June 30, 2020.

    4:00pm FAA implements flexible air traffic control schedule

    The FAA is taking steps to limit the spread of COVID-19 in air traffic control facilities. Each air traffic control facility is establishing separate teams of controllers that will stay together throughout the duty week. Each crew will contain the same employees, limiting the possibility of cross-exposure to COVID-19 that would come through normal shift rotations. If a person on one team gets sick, the only people who would be exposed are the other people on that team. These steps, along with existing contingency plans, further enhance the resiliency of the FAAs air traffic control system.


    4/4/2020

    FAA releases updated guidance for Airport Sponsors and CARES ACT FAQs


    4/3/2020 11:00am

    The FAA issued guidance to FAA inspectors about factors to consider when determining whether to:


    3/31/2020 7:00pm

    The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) will award approximately $10 billion in funds to commercial and general aviation airports from the Trump Administrations newly created Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act (CARES) Airport Program.

    The funds will provide economic relief to airports around the country affected by the COVID-19 pandemic.

    The CARES Act provides funds to increase the federal share to 100 percent for Airport Improvement Program (AIP) and supplemental discretionary grants already planned for fiscal year 2020. Under normal circumstances, AIP grant recipients contribute a matching percentage of the project costs. Providing this additional funding and eliminating the local share will allow critical safety and capacity projects to continue as planned regardless of airport sponsors current financial circumstances.

    Additionally, the CARES Act provides new funds distributed by various formulas for all airports that are part of the national airport system. This includes all commercial service airports, all reliever airports and some public-owned general aviation airports.

    Under this new CARES Airport Program:

    • Primary commercial service airports, with more than 10,000 annual passenger boardings, will receive additional funds based on the number of annual boardings, in a similar way to how they currently receive AIP entitlement funds.
    • All commercial service airports will receive funds based on the number of passengers that board aircraft there, the amount of debt an airport has, and the amount of money the airport has in reserve.
    • General aviation airports will receive funds based on their airport categories, such as National, Regional, Local, Basic and Unclassified.

    The FAA plans to make these funds available in April, and airport sponsors should work with their local Office of Airports field office. The FAA will provide additional guidance on the CARES Airport Program next week.


    3/31/2020 4:40pm

    FAA Announces Additional Pilot Medical Certificate Exemptions

    The FAA is granting an exemption that extends until June 30, 2020, the duration of medical certificates for certain pilots and flight engineers who conduct scheduledand on-demandoperations outside the United States if those medical certificates expire between March 31, 2020, and May 31, 2020.

    COVID-19 is placing a severe burden on the U.S. healthcare system. Requiring pilots to undergo in-person medical examinations would further stress the healthcare system, and would increase the risk of transmitting the virus through personal contact between the doctor and the applicant. The FAA last week issued a policy stating it will not take enforcement action (PDF) against certain pilots or flight engineers who fly domestically with medical certificates that expire between March 31, 2020 and June 30, 2020.


    3/30/2020

    FAA announces additional COVID-19 guidance on drug and alcohol testing, air transport restrictions and airport closures and restrictions.

    Drug and Alcohol Testing

    The FAA has issued guidance to companies whose drug and alcohol testing programs are disrupted by the COVID-19 pandemic. DOT guidance can be viewed at www.transportation.gov.

    Guidance for States, Localities, and Territories Considering Air Transportation Restrictions

    The FAA has prepared guidance for states, localities, and territories that have implemented or may consider implementing quarantine, travel restrictions, and screening requirements on individuals entering from certain locations within the United States and territories. The guidance states there should be coordination with aviation stakeholders 48 hours before a restriction is imposed; air transportation workers, federal aviation and security personnel are exempt from any restrictions; and no measure can be taken to close a federally funded airport without FAA approval.

    Guidance for Airport Sponsors Considering Airport Closures or Restrictions

    The FAA has prepared guidance for airport sponsors contemplating airport closures or restricting airport access at federally funded airports. The FAA wants airport sponsors to closely review and understand what the guidance allows them to do, what they cannot do, and what they should consider before taking any action. In any instance, the FAA must be notified and approve any airport closure.


    3/27/2020

    FAA Takes Steps to Address the Effects of COVID-19 on the Aviation Industry

    The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) is proactively taking steps to help address the widespread economic and health effects that the COVID-19 pandemic is having on the aviation industry. The FAA continues to evaluate a large number of requests from across all aviation industry sectors to help address COVID-19-related effects.

    To date, the FAA has taken the following actions:

    Air Traffic Control Facilities

    The FAA is temporarily closing and thoroughly cleaning air traffic control facilities where employees have tested positive for COVID-19. Every air traffic control facility in the country has a contingency plan (PDF) to keep air traffic moving safely when events impede normal operations. In some cases, this means transferring duties to adjacent facilities.

    Air Carrier Training Exemptions

    The FAA granted certain training exemptions to scheduled and on-demand air carriers due to the unprecedented circumstances associated with the COVID-19 pandemic. The exemptions give operators grace periods for completing certain training and qualification requirements, and give crewmembers relief from having to don protective breathing equipment or oxygen masks in training, checking, or evaluation. The exemptions can be viewed at https://www.regulations.gov/. The docket numbers are FAA-2020-0291; FAA-2020-0292; FAA-2020-0307; and FAA-2020-0308.

    Pilot Medical Certificates

    The FAA will not take enforcement action against certain pilots or flight engineers who fly with medical certificates that expire between March 31, 2020 and June 30, 2020. COVID-19 is placing a severe burden on the U.S. healthcare system. Requiring pilots to undergo in-person medical examinations would further stress the healthcare system, and would increase the risk of transmitting the virus through personal contact between the doctor and the applicant.

    Airport Slot-Use Waivers

    The FAA is temporarily waiving minimum slot-use requirements at U.S. airports to help airlines that cancel flights due to the Coronavirus. Under normal circumstances, airlines can lose their slots at congested airports if they dont use them at least 80 percent of the time. The FAA is waiving the 80-percent-use requirement through May 31, 2020 for U.S. and foreign airlines that have affected flights, and is proposing to extend the waiver through Oct. 24, 2020.

    FAA Construction Projects

    The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has temporarily stopped most construction projects at agency facilities to ensure the safety of employees, contractors and the public during the COVID-19 pandemic. The agency is continuing projects that are in critical phases and would affect operations or safety if not completed. For now, the FAA is delaying the start of new projects. Design work on future projects will continue.

    Airport Construction Projects

    The FAA is working with airport sponsors across the countryto determine the impacts COVID-19 is having on current and planned airport construction. Airport sponsors and the FAA will review all executed Airport Improvement Program (AIP) grants and determine which projects are safety critical, phase of the project, estimated length of project delay, additional costs if the project is delayed, and impacts to overall airport or system operations.The FAA will identify how it may be able prioritize safety-critical projects through funding or process adjustments. The FAA and airport sponsors will work collaboratively to do whatever is reasonably possible to avoid delays in project construction and reduce the delay time when possible. Once a project is ready for construction, the airport owner is responsible for completing construction.

    Airport Improvement Program

    The FAA is working to ensure there are no delays awarding Airport Improvement Program (AIP) funds for 2020 because of COVID-19. Employees with the FAAs Office of Airports are in constant contact with airport sponsors to award all appropriated AIP funds by September 30, 2020. The FAA has worked to automate the AIP process, which enables employees to work remotely and continue to process AIP grants under the current circumstances.

    Temporary Parking of Overflow Aircraft

    The global COVID-19 pandemic has led to flight reductions throughout the airline industry. As a result, the FAA issued CertAlert #20-02 Temporary Parking of Overflow Aircraft, for airport operators who are working with airlines on temporary parking plans for their aircraft. The CertAlert contains a list of recommendations an airport operator should consider when making decisions for overflow aircraft parking. To maintain the highest level of safety, the FAA is working with airport operators to ensure additional safety mitigations are put in place for temporary parking of aircraft.

    Airport Safety Inspections

    The FAAs airport certification safety inspections will continue within required timeframes during the COVID-19 pandemic. The airport certification safety inspectors will complete inspections by September 30, 2020, as required by Part 139 and FAA Order 5280-5D. There will be no impact to safety. The inspections will be conducted using social-distancing measures to protect both FAA and airport personnel.

    Aviation Maintenance Technician Schools

    The FAA is working withstaff and students atAviation Maintenance Technician Schools(AMTS)to allow greater flexibility during the COVID-19 pandemic. TheFAAsguidance to AMTSallows deviations from FAA policy onclass schedules,electronic delivery of assignments, andthe maximum number of absences. EachAMTS school is affected differently, andthe FAA is addressing any deviation from policyor regulationon a case-by-case basis.

    COVID-19 Information

    The FAA is posting extensive information about COVID-19 on its website and on social media. Follow us on Twitter @FAANews, Facebook, LinkedIn, and Instagram for updates.

    Sharing Heath Safety Messages

    The FAA is amplifying health safety messages from other federal agencies including the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Federal Management Agency, Department of State and Department of Homeland Security.

    Pilot Oxygen Mask Requirements

    The FAA has amended its cockpit oxygen-mask regulation to reduce the potential for pilots to be exposed to any pathogens that may be on the masks. The amendment fulfills the requirement of Section 579 of the FAA Reauthorization Act of 2018.

    Expanded Drone Operations

    The FAA has received inquiries about expanded drone operations to respond to COVID-19. We are addressing the inquiries using our existing Part 135 on-demand certificationprocess. Follow us on Twitter @FAADroneZone and Facebook @FAADroneZonefor the latest drone news.

    Puerto Rico Flight Restriction Request

    The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has approved certain requirements for passenger flights to Puerto Rico to help with the response to the COVID-19 pandemic. All scheduled and unscheduled commercial air carrier flights will be required to land at Luis Munoz Marin International Airport (SJU) where public health officials will screen arriving passengers. This includes air carriers that operate under Part 121 of the Federal Aviation Regulations. All domestic and foreign general aviation and charter flights arriving from a location outside Puerto Rico will be required to land first at SJU, Isla Grande Airport (SIG) or Rafael Hernandez Airport (BQN) in Aguadilla for passenger screening before continuing to their final destinations. The restrictions do not apply to air cargo or maintenance flights into Puerto Rico.


    3/24/2020

    CDC Adds More Countries to Level 3 Nonessential Travel Listing

    The CDC has expanded their Level 3 nonessential travel notice to include Australia, countries in South America, parts of Asia and the Middle East. These countries are experiencing widespread transmission of therespiratory illness caused by the novel (new) coronavirus (COVID-19). The CDC recommends that travelers avoid all nonessential travel to all countries in the below list.

    • Australia
    • Brazil
    • Canada
    • Chile
    • Japan
    • Israel
    • Malaysia
    • Pakistan
    • South Korea
    • Thailand
    • Turkey

    Travelers returning from these countries should stay home for 14 days after returning from travel, monitor their health,and practice social distancing.


    3/23/2020

    Only Rely on Official Sources for Accurate COVID-19 Information

    Due to the large amount of speculation regarding COVID-19, the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) is reminding everyone to rely on OFFICIAL sources for accurate information. You can help control the spread of rumors by sharing FEMAs web page with your friends, family and colleagues.

    Additional Information


    3/20/2020

    FAA Statement on COVID-19 cases at FAA Facilities

    Like much of the country, the Federal Aviation Administration is experiencing an increase in COVID-19 cases at air traffic facilities and other offices across the nation.

    Despite the challenges, our commitment to safety will not waver.

    Our air traffic system is resilient and flexible. Every air traffic control facility in the country has a contingency plan to keep air traffic moving safely when events impede normal operations. In some cases, this means transferring duties to adjacent facilities.

    Air traffic controllers, technicians and safety inspectors are highly trained professionals who play critical roles in safely and efficiently moving tens of thousands of aircraft and millions of passengers 24 hours a day, every day.

    Our agencys mission is to operate the worlds largest and most complex airspace system. But we have an equal obligation to ensure the health and safety of our employees.

    Each disruption has a distinct impact on the air traffic system. We are experiencing this at the handful of facilities already affected by COVID-19. This is frustrating and inconvenient, but is necessary in the interest of safety.

    We will do our best to keep the public abreast of a rapidly changing situation. Passengers can check fly.faa.gov for real-time updates about how the air traffic system is performing.

    We appreciate the publics support and patience.


    3/19/2020

    Department of State advises U.S. Citizens to avoid all international travel due to COVID-19.

    The Department of State advises U.S. citizens to avoid all international travel due to the global impact of COVID-19. In countries where commercial departure options remain available, U.S. citizens who live in the United States should arrange for immediate return to the United States, unless they are prepared to remain abroad for an indefinite period.U.S. citizens who live abroad should avoid all international travel.Many countries are experiencing COVID-19 outbreaks and implementing travel restrictions and mandatory quarantines, closing borders, and prohibiting non-citizens from entry with little advance notice.Airlines have cancelled many international flights and several cruise operators have suspended operations or cancelled trips.If you choose to travel internationally, your travel plans may be severely disrupted, and you may be forced to remain outside of the United States for an indefinite timeframe.

    For more information, review the full advisory.


    3/17/2020

    CDC Expands Virus-Related Travel Advisory to UK and Ireland

    The CDC updated their Level 3 Travel Health Notice to include the United Kingdom and Ireland. The United Kingdom is experiencing widespreadongoing transmissionofrespiratory illness caused by the novel (new) coronavirus (COVID-19). Because the United Kingdom shares an open border with the Republic of Ireland (Ireland),CDC recommends that travelers avoid all nonessential travel to all countries in the United Kingdom and Ireland.

    Affected countries include:

    • England
    • Scotland
    • Wales
    • Northern Ireland
    • Republic of Ireland (Ireland)

    Travelers returning fromthe United Kingdom or Ireland shouldstay home for 14 days after returning from travel, monitor their health,and practice social distancing. Please review the latest about Level 3 Travel Health Notices.


    3/15/2020

    DHS Outlines New Process for Americans Returning from Certain European Countries, China, and Iran

    In order to help prevent the spread of travel-related cases of coronavirus in the United States, the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) issued a Notice of Arrival Restrictionsoutlining the process for American citizens, legal permanent residents, and their immediate families who are returning home after recently visiting certain European countries, China, and Iran.

    These European countries, known as the Schengen Area, include: Austria, Belgium, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Italy, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, and Switzerland.

    Effective for flights taking off at 11:59 PM EDT on Friday, March 13th, Americans returning from all restricted countries will now be required to travel through the following 13 airports:

    • Boston-Logan International Airport (BOS), Massachusetts
    • Chicago OHare International Airport (ORD), Illinois
    • Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport (DFW), Texas
    • Detroit Metropolitan Airport (DTW), Michigan
    • Daniel K. Inouye International Airport (HNL), Hawaii
    • Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport (ATL), Georgia
    • John F. Kennedy International Airport (JFK), New York
    • Los Angeles International Airport, (LAX), California
    • Miami International Airport (MIA), Florida
    • Newark Liberty International Airport (EWR), New Jersey
    • San Francisco International Airport (SFO), California
    • Seattle-Tacoma International Airport (SEA), Washington
    • Washington-Dulles International Airport (IAD), Virginia

    Upon arrival, travelers will proceed to standard customs processing. They will then continue to enhanced entry screening where the passenger will be asked about their medical history, current condition, and asked for contact information for local health authorities. Passengers will then be given written guidance about COVID-19 and directed to proceed to their final destination, and immediately home-quarantine in accordance with CDC best practices.

    In order to ensure compliance, local and State public health officials will contact individuals in the days and weeks following their arrival.

    Additional Information


    3/13/2020

    Coronavirus Travel Advisories Expanded to Include Most of Europe

    CDC has expanded its Level-3 travel advisory and now recommends that travelers avoid all nonessential travel to most countries in Europe. See the full list of countries.


    3/9/2020

    Guidance for Travelers from Countries with Widespread Sustained (Ongoing) Transmission Arriving in the United States

    To slow the spread of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) into the United States, CDC is working with state and local public health partners to implement after-travel health precautions.

    Depending on your travel history, you will be asked to stay home for a period of 14 days from the time you left an area with widespread or ongoing community spread (Level 3 Travel Health Notice).

    Countries that have a Level 3 Travel Health Notice (widespread, ongoing transmission):

    • China
    • Iran
    • Italy
    • South Korea

    Take these steps to monitor your health and practice social distancing:

    1. Take your temperature with a thermometer two times a day to monitor for fever. Also watch for cough or trouble breathing.
    2. Stay home and avoid contact with others. Do not go to work or school for this 14-day period. Discuss your work situation with your employer before returning to work.
    3. Do not take public transportation, taxis, or ride-shares during the time you are practicing social distancing.
    4. Avoid crowded places (such as shopping centers and movie theaters) and limit your activities in public.
    5. Keep your distance from others (about 6 feet or 2 meters).

    Download the CDCs COVID-19 Traveler Information Card.


    3/5/2020

    Air travel plans may be affected by the virus. Check with your airline before heading to the airport.

    The evolving Coronavirus (COVID-19) situation may impact your air travel plans. Many airlines have posted travel alerts for passengers on their websites and have instituted flexible travel policies. Please check with your airline about the status of your flight before you leave for the airport. The following links are to airline-specific flight status updates:


    3/3/2020

    CDC Recommends Travelers Avoid All Nonessential Travel to Italy

    The State Department and CDCrecommend avoiding all nonessential travel to Italy due to the Coronavirus (COVID-19).Travel advisoriesrelated to the virus now include the following countries:

    • Italy
    • South Korea
    • Japan
    • China
    • Iran

    The CDC has established an interactive map with country-specific travel health information about the virus. Travelers can also sign up to receive email updates about the virus on this same CDC webpage.


    2/23/2020

    Travel Advisories for South Korea and Japan

    The State Department and CDC recommend travelers exercise increased caution when traveling to South Korea and Japan due to the virus.

    The CDC also recommends that high risk travelers to South Korea and Japanexercise special precautions.

    Travelers should also enroll in the State Departments Smart Traveler Enrollment Program to receive alerts and updates while traveling.


    2/2/2020

    Guidance from the CDC on What the Public, Air Carriers and Crews Can Do

    The current outbreak of 2019 novel coronavirus originated in China but has now spread internationally, impacting an increasing number of countries. In the coming days and weeks, we expect more confirmed cases in the United States, including more person-to-person spread.

    The goal of an aggressive ongoing public health response is to prevent spread of this virus in the community in the United States. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) provide the following guidance to the public:

    What You Should Do

    • Stay informed CDC is updating its website daily with the latest information and advice for the public. (www.cdc.gov/ncov)
    • Currently, there is no vaccine to prevent 2019-nCoV infe

NOTE: The information above is presented as is. We can take no responsibility for errors occurred in the transmission of this feed.

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