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About FAA

At FAA, our mission is to provide the safest, most efficient aerospace system in the world. We continually strive to improve the safety and efficiency of flight in this country.


FAA.gov News and Updates

New Certification Rule for Small Airplanes Becomes Effective

On August 30, the final rule overhauling airworthiness standards for general aviation airplanes published in December of 2016 officially went into effect. The Federal Aviation Administration ( FAA) expects this rule will enable faster installation of innovative, safety-enhancing technologies into small airplanes, while reducing costs for the aviation industry.

With these performance-based standards, the FAA delivers on its promise to implement forward-looking, flexible rules that encourage innovation. Specifically, the new part 23 revolutionizes standards for airplanes weighing 19,000 pounds or less and with 19 or fewer passenger seats by replacing prescriptive requirements with performance-based standards coupled with consensus-based compliance methods for specific designs and technologies. The rule also adds new certification standards to address GA loss of control accidents and in-flight icing conditions.

This regulatory approach recognizes there is more than one way to deliver on safety. It offers a way for industry and the FAA to collaborate on new technologies and to keep pace with evolving aviation designs and concepts.

The new rule responds to Congressional mandates that direct the FAA to streamline approval of safety advancements for small GA airplanes. It also addresses recommendations from the FAAs 2013 Part 23 Reorganization Aviation Rulemaking Committee, which suggested a more streamlined approval process for safety equipment on those airplanes.

The new part 23 also promotes regulatory harmonization among the FAAs foreign partners, including the European Aviation Safety Agency, Transport Canada Civil Aviation, and Brazils National Civil Aviation Authority. Harmonization may help minimize certification costs for airplane and engine manufacturers, and operators of affected equipment, who want to certify their products for the global market.

This regulatory change is a leading example of how the FAA is transforming its Aircraft Certification Service into an agile organization that can support aviation industry innovation in the coming years. AIR Transformation improves the efficiency and effectiveness of the Aircraft Certification Safety System by focusing FAA resources on up-front planning, the use of performance based standards, and a robust risk-based systems oversight program, while leveraging Industrys responsibility to comply with regulations.

Additional Resources:

FAA Air Traffic Report

Today's Air Traffic Report:

Afternoon thunderstorms may slow flights today in Atlanta (ATL), Boston (BOS), Charlotte (CLT), the New York area (EWR, JFK, LGA), Philadelphia (PHL) and the Washington, D.C., area (BWI, DCA, IAD). Low clouds may cause delays this morning in Los Angeles (LAX) and San Diego (SAN), while smoke from wildfires could reduce visibility in San Francisco (SFO) and Seattle (SEA).

Pilots: Check out the new Graphical Forecasts for Aviation (GFA) Tool from the Aviation Weather Center.

For up-to-the-minute air traffic operations information, visit fly.faa.gov, and follow @FAANews on Twitter for the latest news and Air Traffic Alerts.

The FAA Air Traffic Report provides a reasonable expectation of any daily impactsto normal air traffic operations, i.e. arrival/departure delays, ground stoppages, airport closures. This information is for air traffic operations planning purposes and is reliable as weather forecasts and other factors beyond our ability to control.

Always check with your air carrier for flight-specific delay information.

FAA Supports Drone Assessments for Houston Response and Recovery

By Thursday morning, August 31, 2017, the Federal Aviation Administration had issued 43 unmanned aircraft system authorizations to drone operators supporting the response and recovery for Hurricane Harvey or covering it as part of the media.

The authorizations cover a broad range of activities by local, state and federal officials who are conducting damage assessments of critical infrastructure, homes and businesses to help target, prioritize and expedite recovery activities.

The FAA issued eight of the approvals to a railroad company to survey damage along a major rail line running through the city. Five others were issued so oil or energy companies could look for damage to their facilities, fuel tanks, power lines, and other critical components of the local power grid.

A local fire department and county emergency management officials are operating drones to check for any damage to local roads, bridges, underpasses, water treatment plants, and other infrastructure that may need immediate repairs.

State environmental quality officials are flying drones to understand the impacts of flooding and drainage, and cell tower operators are conducting damage assessments of their structures and associated ground equipment. An operator supporting a number of different insurance companies has started on damage assessments of residences and businesses to speed up the claims process.

In addition to the direct response and recovery efforts, four media outlets are operating drones over Houston to provide ongoing coverage to local residents and the rest of the world about flooding and damage in the Houston area.

FAA's Hurricane Harvey Update

August 30 Update

The Federal Aviation Administrationhas continued to handle emergency and relief operations at a number of airports in the Hurricane Harvey area, including at Houston Hobby and George Bush Intercontinental. The FAA is prepared to support the resumption of commercial service flights when airport authorities reopen the airports.

Drone Users : In areas where Temporary Flight Restrictions (TFRs) are in place, you cannot fly a drone without specific FAA authorization. If you do not have this authorization, you should not be flying in the area covered by the TFR. The FAA has issued a number of TFRs for the Houston area and Beaumont over the past few days that outline the coordination process for authorized operations.

Houston
Rosenberg
Crosby
Ingleside-on-the-Bay
Beaumont

The FAA warns drone operators that flying an unauthorized drone could interfere with local, state and federal rescue and recovery missions. You could be subject to significant fines if you interfere with emergency response operations. Flying a drone without authorization in or near the disaster area may violate federal, state, or local laws and ordinances, even if aTFRis not in place.Allow first responders to save lives and property without interference.

Commercial passengers: Passengers should be aware that resuming normal airline operations will take time and airlines may not be operating a full flight schedule immediately after the airports reopen.Although airports may be listed as open, flooding on local roadways may limit access to airports for passengers, as well as the employees who work for the airlines or at the airport.As a result, every aspect of your trip to the airport, including parking, checking in, getting through security and boarding may take longer than usual.As always, check with airlines about the status of your flight before you leave for the airport.

General Aviation pilots: The FAA has issued a number of TFRs for the Houston area and Beaumont over the past few days. Pilots should always check Notices for Airmen before a flight.

Houston
Rosenberg
Crosby
Ingleside-on-the-Bay
Beaumont

Continue monitoring TFR.FAA.gov and @FAANews on Twitter for the latest information. The FAA is coordinating media flights in the area covered by the TFR, under the conditions outlined in the notices. Regardless of where you are flying, always be aware of the weather conditions along your entire planned route. If you are planning to travel to or from Texas or Louisiana, contact your destination airport before you take off to obtain the most current information about local weather and airfield conditions.


August 29 Update

The Federal Aviation Administrationhas continued to handle emergency and relief operations at a number of airports in the Hurricane Harvey area, including at Houston Hobby and George Bush Intercontinental. The FAA is prepared to support the resumption of commercial service flights when airport authorities reopen the airports.

This Hurricane Harvey information is critical so that first responders can conduct rescue and recovery operations.

Drone Users: The FAA warns unauthorized drone operators that flying a drone could interfere with the U.S. National Guard, U.S. Marine Corps, U.S. Coast Guard, and the Texas Military Departments rescue and recovery missions as evacuations escalate due to rising water. You could be subject to significant fines if you interfere with emergency response operations. Flying a drone without authorization in or near the disaster area may violate federal, state, or local laws and ordinances, even if a Temporary Flight Restriction(TFR) is not in place.Allow first responders to save lives and property without interference.

Commercial passengers: Passengers should be aware that resuming normal airline operations will take time and airlines may not be operating a full flight schedule immediately after the airports reopen.Although airports may be listed as open, flooding on local roadways may limit access to airports for passengers, as well as the employees who work for the airlines or at the airport.As a result, every aspect of your trip to the airport, including parking, checking in, getting through security and boarding may take longer than usual.As always, check with airlines about the status of your flight before you leave for the airport.

GA pilots: There is currently a TFR in place for Rosenberg, Texas and Houston, Texas until further notice. Continue monitoring TFR.FAA.gov and @FAANews on Twitter for the latest information. Regardless of where you are flying, always be aware of the weather conditions. If you are planning to travel to or from Texas or Louisiana, know the runway conditions before operating by contacting your destination facility.

Operations Update: The FAA has set up a Mobile Air Traffic Control Tower (MATCT) at Fort Worth Meacham (KTFW) awaiting further deployment as needed.


August 25

Air Traffic Control
The Federal Aviation Administration closely monitors forecasted hurricanes and severe weather events and prepares FAA facilities and equipment to withstand storm damage. We prepare and protect air traffic control facilities along the projected storm path so we can quickly resume operations after the hurricane passes. Enabling flights to resume quickly is critical to support disaster relief efforts.

FAA control towers in hurricane-prone areas are designed and built to sustain hurricane force winds. Each control tower has a maximum wind sustainability. When the winds approach that level, controllers evacuate the tower cabs. They may remain in the building on duty in a secure lower level, and are ready to go back to work as soon as the storm passes.

We also protect communications equipment and navigational aids to the greatest extent possible. As the storm approaches, we disable airport surveillance radar antennas to allow them to spin freely, minimizing potential wind damage. This limits damage to the antenna motors and allows radar coverage to resume quickly after the storm passes.

Commercial Travelers
Because of Hurricane Harvey, airlines are likely to cancel many flights in the direct path of the storm and the surrounding area. Flights that are not cancelled may be delayed. Please continue to check the status of your flight with your airline. You can also check the status of some major airports in the storm path by visiting Fly.FAA.gov, which is updated regularly.

Drone Users
The FAA warns unauthorized drone operators that they may be subject to significant fines if they interfere with emergency response operations. Flying a drone without authorization in or near the disaster area may violate federal, state, or local laws and ordinances, even if a Temporary Flight Restriction (TFR) is not in place.Allow first responders to save lives and property without interference.

General Aviation Pilots
Standard check lists are even more important in and around severe weather. Be aware of weather conditions throughout the entire route of your planned flight. A pilots failure to recognize deteriorating weather conditions continues to cause or contribute to accidents.

FAA Administrator Huerta dedicates new Taos runway

Culminating a two-decade-long effort, FAA Administrator Michael P. Huerta today joined local and state officials in dedicating the new, 8,600-foot runway at Taos Regional Airport.

The new runway is perpendicular to the original runway. It will enable pilots to operate more safely at times of year when wind directions make the airfield more challenging.

The project also comes with important provisions aimed at protecting the lands and lifestyle of the Taos Pueblo.

An airport is a treasure. It is the lifeblood of a community, an asset that must be nurtured, Huerta said. The result of our collaborative efforts is a project that will improve both the safety and utility of this important regional transportation link, while respecting the traditional values and unique culture of the Taos Pueblo.

Federal grants totaling about $25 million paid for most of the project cost.

The environmental review for the project included extensive government-to-government consultation with the Taos Pueblo, Town of Taos and numerous state and federal agencies.

This resulted in a number of mitigations, including the installation and operation of a passive noise monitoring system. The system, which began operating in 2014, will support a pre-project and post-project comparison of flights over the Taos World Heritage Site and adjacent lands.

Additionally, the FAA raised the voluntary minimum flight altitude above the World Heritage site from 2,000 feet to 5,000 feet.

We got this project right because all of the stakeholders approached this in a spirit of collaborative partnership, Huerta said. Without tenacity, dedication and determination we would not be standing here today.


These aviation news pages are compiled with a RSS feed from several news sources. As such, we can not take any responsibility for the correctness of these news items.