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FAA News & Updates

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About FAA

At FAA, our mission is to provide the safest, most efficient aerospace system in the world. We continually strive to improve the safety and efficiency of flight in this country.

FAA News

  • New York City Flight Restrictions September 21-29 During UN General Assembly

    Date: 09/20/2019 11:50 PM

    General aviation pilots who are planning to fly in the New York/New Jersey Metropolitan Area between September 21 and September 29 should check frequently and before every flight to make sure they are aware of the flight restrictions that will be in place for the 74thSession of the United Nations General Assembly.

    Knowing the rules will help operators avoid airspace violations.

    The FAA is also advising drone pilots that the airspace within the Temporary Flight Restriction (TFR) area will be a No DroneZone at the same time. Operators may not fly their drones within that airspace while the TFR is in effect. The FAA, federal law enforcement agencies and the Department of Defense will closely monitor the airspace for unauthorized operations. They may take action against drones operating in the No DroneZone that are deemed a credible safety or security threat. Pilots who operate drones within the TFR also will be subject to possible enforcement action.

    The TFR starts at 8 a.m. Eastern Daylight Time (EDT) on Saturday, September 21, and ends at 5 p.m. EDT on Sunday, September 29. The FAA strongly advises pilots to check regularly for Notices to Airmen (NOTAMs) since the FAA expects to issue numerous notices at different times during the period that the TFR is in effect. It is essential for pilots to check regularly in order to have the most current information before their flights.

    During this period, no pilot may operate an aircraft within the TFR unless authorized by FAA air traffic control, except for law enforcement, air ambulance and aircraft that are directly supporting the Secret Service and regularly scheduled commercial passenger and cargo carriers operating under an approved Transportation Security Administration security program.

    General aviation aircraft cannot operate within the center or inner ring of the TFR. Aircraft operating under instrument flight rules or visual flight rules may operate within the outer ring of the TFR as long as they are on a flight plan, displaying an aircraft identifier code and are in two-way communication with air traffic control.

    Pilots should check NOTAMS frequently, especially before their flights. Drone operators must stay away from the No DroneZone.

  • FAA Air Traffic Report

    Date: 09/20/2019 03:54 PM

    Today's Air Traffic Report:

    Delays are likely today in Houston (HOU, IAH) from flooding caused by heavy rain yesterday. Thunderstorms could slow flights today in Dallas-Fort Worth (DAL, DFW). Low clouds are forecast this morning in Seattle (SEA).

    Pilots: Check out the new Graphical Forecasts for Aviation (GFA) Tool from the Aviation Weather Center.

    For up-to-the-minute air traffic operations information, visit fly.faa.gov, and follow @FAANews on Twitter for the latest news and Air Traffic Alerts.

    The FAA Air Traffic Report provides a reasonable expectation of any daily impactsto normal air traffic operations, i.e. arrival/departure delays, ground stoppages, airport closures. This information is for air traffic operations planning purposes and is reliable as weather forecasts and other factors beyond our ability to control.

    Always check with your air carrier for flight-specific delay information.

  • FAA Update on Hurricane Dorian

    Date: 09/17/2019 11:19 PM

    9/17/2019

    A team of four FAA Technical Operations Specialists and a mobile FAA air traffic control tower arrived in Marsh Harbour, the Bahamas, on a C-17 today. The tower will help the Bahamian government facilitate humanitarian response flights.


    9/8/2019

    The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) advises pilots about flight restrictions for Bahamian Airspace. At the request of the Bahamian Government, the FAA has issued a Temporary Flight Restriction (TFR) for U.S. aircraft and pilots entering Bahamian airspace in Hurricane Dorian affected areas in order to reserve airspace for search and rescue and humanitarian assistance.


    9/7/2019

    All ACAs are cancelled, except North Carolina: (FDC 9/2806(PDF)).

    Drone pilots should check for flight restrictions before flying.

    Now that Hurricane Dorian has passed, the FAA has an important reminder as U.S. government agencies respond to the storms damage.

    Drone pilots: beaware that you could face significant penalties that may exceed $20,000 if you interfere with emergency response operations. Flying a drone without authorization in or near the disaster area may violate federal, state, or local laws and ordinances, even if aTFRis not in place. Allow first responders to save lives and property without interference.If you are not certified as a remote pilot or do not already hold a COA, you cannot fly.

    Drone pilots must comply with FAA rules and should:

    • Avoid flying in the area unless conducting an active disaster response or recovery mission.
    • Be aware that the FAA might issue aTFRin the affected area. Be sure to check for active TFRs if you plan to fly.
    • Remember that you cannot fly inside a TFR without FAA approval.

    Droneemergency operations and response:

    During a natural disaster, do not fly your drone in or around emergency response efforts, unless you have special authorization to do so. There are low flying aircraft as part of the storm response mostly in low visibility areas. If you are flying, emergency response operations cannot. You may be able to get expedited approval to operate in the TFR through the FAAsSpecial Governmental Interest(SGI) process as outlined inFAA Order JO 7200.23A. Submit anEmergency Operation Request Form(MS Word)with your existing Remote Pilot Certificate or existing Certification of Authorization (COA) and send to the FAA's System Operations Support Center (SOSC) at[email protected].


    9/5/2019

    Dorian continues to move north. Airline passengers to check with their air carrier for flight cancellations and delays.

    As Hurricane Dorian moves north, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) advises airline passengers to check with their air carrier for flight cancellations and delays. Airlines make decisions about their flight schedules. Be aware that flights can stop long before winds reach hurricane strength.

    General aviation and drone pilots should continue to checkNOTAMs, Temporary Flight Restrictions (TFRs), and Aircraft Safety Alerts before flying.

    The FAA has established Airspace Coordination Areas (ACA) over the southeast coast along the projected path of Hurricane Dorian to allow disaster response and recovery flights to operate safely. Pilots flying in the ACAs should be very cautious because many aircraft are operating in the area. Drone pilots should avoid flying in the ACAs without FAA permission. Aircraft and drone pilots should check NOTAMs frequently for the latest information about flying along the coast.

    The active ACAs are as follows:

    The FAA also issued two Special Advisory NOTAMs for contingency flow operations from Florida to the Bahamas and for Bahamas recovery andresponse operations.

    Ahead of the storm,FAA techniciansprotect communications equipment and navigational aids to the greatest extent possible to enable flights to resume quickly after the storm passes. FAA technicians fuel and test engine generators and so they can power equipment and facilities if commercial power fails. We switch to engine generator power before the storm in anticipation of commercial power failures. Watch our short video on YouTube to learn more about how the FAA handles hurricanes.


    9/4/2019

    Some Florida airports are back to normal operations as Hurricane Dorian moves north towards the Carolinas.

    The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) is working with our government partners and aviation stakeholders to safely manage air traffic affected by Hurricane Dorian. TheFAA Command Centeris managing the rerouting of flights in the airspace affected by the storm. Many airports in Florida are now back to normal operations. Airlines who fly to other airports in the path of the storm may delay or cancel flights. As always, check with your airline about the status of your flight before you leave for the airport.

    General aviation and drone pilots should checkNOTAMsandTFRs. Drone pilots must comply with FAA rules and should:

    • Avoid flying in the area unless conducting an active disaster response or recovery mission.
    • Be aware that the FAA might issue aTFRin the affected area. Be sure to check for active TFRs if you plan to fly.
    • Remember that you cannot fly inside a TFR without FAA approval.

    The FAA has established four Airspace Coordination Areas (ACA) over the southeast coast along the projected path of Hurricane Dorian to allow disaster response and recovery flights to operate safely. Pilots flying in the ACAs should be very cautious because many aircraft are operating in the area. Drone pilots should avoid flying in the ACAs without FAA permission. Aircraft and drone pilots should check NOTAMs frequently for the latest information about flying along the coast. The ACA for South Florida (FDC 9/1722) is cancelled.

    The active ACAs are as follows:


    9/3/2019

    The FAA continues to work to safely manage air traffic affected by Hurricane Dorian.

    The FAA continues to work with our government partners and aviation stakeholders to safely manage air traffic affected by Hurricane Dorian. The FAA Command Center is managing the rerouting of flights and is helping airlines as they add some flights to aid evacuation efforts. As of 1:00 p.m. ET today, more than 2,000 U.S. airline flights have been cancelled due to the storm. As always, check with your airline about the status of your flight before you leave for the airport. Major carriers provide flight status updates on their websites:

    The agency has established three Airspace Coordination Areas (ACA) over the eastern coast of Florida (FDC 9/1735 and FDC 9/1722) and the Georgia coast (FDC 9/2301). The ACAs allow a safe environment for disaster response and recovery flights. Aircraft pilots flying in the ACAs should be very cautious because many flights are operating in the area. Pilots should avoid flying in the ACAs without FAA permission. The ACAs are effective until 2 p.m. EDT on Thursday, September 5. However, the FAA can cancel the ACAs at any time. Aircraft and drone pilots should check NOTAMs frequently for the latest information about flying along the coast.


    9/1/2019

    Hurricane Dorian has strengthened and changed its projected path. Travelers should check with their airline before heading to the airport.

    The FAA is closely monitoring Category 5 Hurricane Dorian which is expected to remain a catastrophic hurricane during the next few days.

    The agency has a team ready to to go to the Bahamas after the storm passes to assess any damage to FAA communications equipment. We are preparing our facilities and equipment in Florida, Georgia, South Carolina and North Carolina.

    Airline passengers who plan to travel near the storms projected path, from Florida to North Carolina, should check flight status with their airline before heading to the airport. Airports make decisions about closing their facilities and may remain open even after commercial flights have stopped. Airport status and general airport delay information is available atfly.faa.gov.

    Follow us on Twitter @FAANews for updates and aviation safety information.


    8/30/2019

    Travelers, pilots and drone users! Stay informed about Hurricane Dorian's impact on aviation.

    The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) is monitoring Hurricane Dorian closely and preparing FAA facilities and equipment along the southeast coast of Florida to withstand potential damage so flights can quickly resume after the storm passes. Restoring air carrier service is critical to support disaster relief efforts.

    Travelers

    Airlines make decisions about their flight schedules. Flights can stop long before winds reach hurricane strength. Travelers should check with their airlines before heading to the airport for a flight to or from the southeast coast of Florida. The FAA does not direct or advise airlines about cancelling flights.

    Airports in the area of potential impact make decisions about closing their facilities. In many cases, airports remain open and do not officially close even when flights have stopped. The FAA does not direct or advise airports to open or close.

    The FAA maintains air traffic control radar coverage and provides service to flights for as long as possible. FAA control towers in hurricane-prone areas are designed and built to sustain hurricane force winds. Each control tower has a maximum wind sustainability, which can range from 55 to 75 miles per hour. When winds approach those speeds, controllers evacuate the tower cabs.

    Ahead of the storm, FAA technicians protect communications equipment and navigational aids to the greatest extent possible to enable flights to resume quickly after the storm passes. FAA technicians test engine generators and ensure they are fully fueled so they can power equipment and facilities if commercial power fails. We switch to engine generator power before the storm in anticipation of commercial power failures.

    After the storm, we assess damage to FAA facilities and navigational aids. We set priorities to quickly re-establish critical equipment. The FAA has equipment, supplies and people ready to move into the affected areas as soon as the storm passes to restore air traffic control facilities that may be damaged by Hurricane Dorian. Teams of technicians and engineers from other locations travel to the affected areas to assess damage and begin restoring equipment and facilities working closely with the local technical teams.

    General Aviation Pilots

    Standard checklists are even more important in and around severe weather. Be aware of weather conditions throughout the entire route of your planned flight. A pilots failure to recognize deteriorating weather conditions continues to cause or contribute to accidents. Be sure to check NOTAMs, Temporary Flight Restrictions (TFRs), and Aircraft Safety Alerts before you go.

    Check out the FAAs Hurricane Preparedness Guidance.

    Drone Users

    Drone users should check NOTAMs and TFRs and avoid flying in areas where drones are prohibited.

    Drone pilots must comply with FAA rules and should:

    1. Avoid flying in the area unless conducting an active disaster response or recovery mission.
    2. Be aware that the FAA might issue a TFR in the affected area. Be sure to check for active TFRs if you plan to fly.
    3. Remember that you cannot fly inside a TFR without FAA approval.

    Drone emergency operations and response:

    • During a natural disaster, do not fly your drone in or around emergency response efforts, unless you have special authorization to do so. There are low flying aircraft as part of the storm response mostly in low visibility areas. If you are flying, emergency response operations cannot.
    • You may be able to get expedited approval to operate in the TFR through the FAAs Special Governmental Interest(SGI) process as outlined inFAA Order JO 7200.23A. Submit an Emergency Operation Request Form with your existing Remote Pilot Certificate or existing Certification of Authorization (COA) and send to the FAA's System Operations Support Center (SOSC) at [email protected]

    Dont Be That Guy!

    Be aware that significant penalties that may exceed $20,000 if drone operators interfere with emergency response operations. Flying a drone without authorization in or near the disaster area may violate federal, state, or local laws and ordinances, even if aTFR is not in place. Allow first responders to save lives and property without interference.

    If you are not certified as a remote pilot or do not already hold a COA, you cannot fly.

    Follow the FAA on social media for the latest aviation news!

  • Fly Safe: Prevent Loss of Control Accidents

    Date: 09/13/2019 12:38 AM

    The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and the general aviation (GA) communitys national #FlySafe campaign helps educate GA pilots about how to avoid loss of control (LOC) accidents.

    A LOC accident involves an unintended departure of an aircraft from controlled flight. LOC can happen when the aircraft enters a flight regime that is outside its normal flight envelope and quickly develops into a stall or spin. It can introduce an element of surprise for the pilot.

    LOC is the No. 1 root cause of fatalities in GA accidents. More than 25% of GA fatalities occur during the maneuvering phase of flight. Of those accidents, half involve stall/spin scenarios.

    Stay safe! Thisseries will show you how you can incorporate safety into every flight.

    Be Alert After Maintenance

    Do you know how to properly preflight your aircraft after maintenance? Many pilots secretly admit that they sometimes dont quite know what they are looking for. Does that concern you? It should, since the pilot is the final authority when it comes to the aircrafts fitness for safe flight.

    As a pilot and/or aircraft owner, it is in your best interest to know and understand every component of your aircraft. You may think you have even less to worry about after your aircraft comes back from the shop. It should be in great shape, right?

    Actually, aircraft just out of maintenance are more likely to have safety-of-flight issues than an aircraft in good condition flown on a daily basis. Something simple shouldnt cause a problem, but work on multiple systems leaves the door open for more than a few complications.

    For example, in-flight emergencies and accidents have occurred with incorrectly rigged flight control or trim systems. Loose bolts or a forgotten connector have led to other tragedies. Its best to be on the safe side, know what work has been done, know what you are looking for, and perform thorough preflight checks.

    Advanced Preflight Checks

    Advanced Preflights go above and beyond the normal preflight checklist. Create your checklist by reviewing the maintenance history of the aircraft, and once you have that information, develop your additional items checklist. Once you have made this list, you can use it in all future preflight inspections. Find and review all aircraft records, including receipts, work orders, FAA Form 337s (Major Repair and Alteration forms) and approval for return to service tags (8130-3 Forms). Find any Supplemental Type Certificate (STC) data, including information on items no longer installed on the aircraft.

    Some additional tips:

    • Become familiar with all controls and systems before maintenance, and create a baseline. Having this information will make it easier for you to find any abnormal functions after maintenance.
    • Coordinate with your mechanic to determine exactly what has been accomplished. Give those systems an extra look-over before flight.
    • Pay particular attention to the aircraft components that were replaced or repaired. If you suspect a problem, ask your mechanic to recheck the aircraft.
    • Be ready to abort take-off if something doesnt feel right.
    • For the first flight, stay in the pattern within gliding distance to the runway.

    Your safety, and the safety of those who fly with you, depends on your vigilance. Check, ask questions, and recheck. Your life may depend on it!

    Be sure to document your achievement in the Wings Proficiency Program. Its a great way to stay on top of your game and keep you flight review current.

    More about LOC:

    Contributing factors may include:

    • Poor judgment or aeronautical decision making
    • Failure to recognize an aerodynamic stall or spin and execute corrective action
    • Intentional failure to comply with regulations
    • Failure to maintain airspeed
    • Failure to follow procedure
    • Pilot inexperience and proficiency
    • Use of prohibited or over-the-counter drugs, illegal drugs, or alcohol

    Did you know?

    • From October 2017 through September 2018, 382 people died in 226 GA accidents.
    • LOC was the No. 1 cause of these accidents.
    • LOC happens in all phases of flight.It can happen anywhere and at any time.
    • There is one fatal accident involving LOC every four days.

    Learn more:

    Check out this FAA FAASTeam Fact Sheet on Advanced Preflight After Maintenance.

    The NTSB provides these important preflight safety tips.

    AOPA has a number of helpful resources, including How to Pre-Flight an Airplane.

    Whats coming for the future? Learn about the benefits NextGen is bringing.

    Time is getting short! The FAAs Equip ADS-B website gives you the information you need to equip now.

    Curious about FAA regulations (Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations)? Its a good idea to stay on top of them. You can find current FAA regulations on this website.

    TheFAASafety.govwebsite has Notices, FAAST Blasts, online courses, webinars, and more on key general aviation safety topics.

    TheWINGS Pilot Proficiency Programhelps pilots build an educational curriculum suitable for their unique flight requirements. It is based on the premise that pilots who maintain currency and proficiency in the basics of flight will enjoy a safer and more stress-free flying experience.

    TheGeneral Aviation Joint Steering Committee (GAJSC)comprises government and industry experts who work together to use data to identify risk, pinpoint trends through root-cause analysis, and develop safety strategies to reduce the risk of GA accidents. The GAJSC combines the expertise of many key decision-makers in the FAA, several government agencies such as the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, and stakeholder groups. Industry participants include the Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association, Experimental Aircraft Association, General Aviation Manufacturers Association, Light Aircraft Manufacturers Association, National Business Aviation Association, National Air Transportation Association, National Association of Flight Instructors, Society of Aviation and Flight Educators, and the aviation insurance industry. The National Transportation Safety Board and the European Aviation Safety Agency participate as observers.

  • FAA, UAS Partners Complete Successful Demos

    Date: 09/04/2019 11:31 PM

    The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), NASA and their partners in a pilot program that is laying the groundwork for an Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) traffic management system successfully demonstrated how such a system can work in the future.

    The demonstrations, conducted at three separate test sites selected by the FAA for the UAS Traffic Management Pilot Program (UPP), showed that multiple, Beyond Visual Line of Sight (BVLOS) drone operations can be safely conducted at low altitudes (below 400 feet) in airspace where FAA air traffic services are not provided.

    As demand for low altitude drone use increases, the FAA, NASA and the UPP partners are working together to accommodate these operations safely and efficiently.

    In January, the FAA selected three UPP test sites: the Virginia Tech Mid-Atlantic Aviation Partnership (VT MAAP), the Northern Plains UAS Test Site (NPUASTS) in Grand Forks, N.D., and the Nevada Institute for Autonomous Systems (NIAS) in Las Vegas, Nev.

    • The first demonstration, which involved the VT MAAP, took place at Virginia Tech on June 13.

      During the demonstration, separate drone flights delivered packages, studied wildlife, surveyed a corn field and covered a court case for TV. Because the flights were near an airport, all four flight plans were submitted through a service supplier and received approval to launch as planned.

      While these flights were being conducted, an emergency helicopter needed to quickly transport a car crash victim to a hospital. The helicopter pilot submitted a request for a UAS Volume Reservation (UVR)an alert used to notify nearby drone operators of the emergency.

      The deliveries were re-routed until the UVR was completed. The wildlife study, field survey and court coverage continued safely away from the helicopters path.

      Each operation was conducted without conflict.

    • The second demonstration, which involved the Northern Plains UAS Test Site (NPUASTS), took place in Grand Forks on July 10.

      During the demonstration, which occurred near an airport, a photographer and Part 107 drone operator took photos of firefighter training. An aviation student at the University of North Dakota used a drone to scan for the best tailgating location. Another Part 107 operator, employed at the electric company, used a drone to assess power line damage after recent strong winds.

      The two Part 107 operators submitted flight plans due to their proximity to an airport, receiving proper approvals. During their flights, they received a UVR alert that a medevac helicopter was transporting a patient to the hospital from the firefighter training area. The operator taking photos of the training landed the drone before the UVR notice became active. The power line survey and the flight over the tailgate area continued at a safe distance.

    • The third, which involved the Nevada Institute for Autonomous Systems (NIAS), took place in Las Vegas on August 1.

      During the demonstration, separate UAS flights were conducted to survey a golf course before a tournament, get video footage of a property being sold, and scan a nearby lake for boating opportunities.

      All three operators accessed UAS Facility Maps and worked with a UAS Service Supplier (USS) to receive the proper approvals to conduct their flights.

      A fire erupted at one of the golf course clubhouses. First responders sent a helicopter to contain the fire. They submitted a request to a USS to create a UVR. The UVR information is also shared with the FAA. The FAA shares the information with public portals, notifying each of the UAS operators that the firefighting helicopter was on its way to their flying area.

      Each of the UAS operators, being properly notified, were able to either land or continue their operations at a safe distance.

    The UPP was established in April 2017 as an important component for identifying the initial set of industry and FAA capabilities required to support UAS Traffic Management operations. The analysis of results from the demonstrations will provide an understanding of the level of investment required for each stakeholder's implementation.

    The results from the UPP will provide a proof of concept for UAS Traffic Management capabilities currently in research and development, and will provide the basis for initial deployment of UTM capabilities.

    Ultimately, the FAA will define the UTM regulatory framework that third-party providers will operate within.

    Check out our video about the UPP demonstrations.


Some of these aviation news pages are compiled with a RSS feed from several news sources. As such, we can not take any responsibility for the correctness of these items.


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